Stuff I See On Charts That Drives Normocephalic

As I exist on the very edge of outrageous crotchetiness consistently, it doesn’t take much to push me over the edge. Here are a few things that do.

Why do history and physical review seem like interpretations of cross examinations? In particular, why to specialists state, “Patient denies liquor utilize”? It’s as though the patient has been blamed for utilizing liquor and when she says she doesn’t drink, we say she “denies” it. As far as I can tell, most by far of patients come clean amid H&P interviews. There’s a distinction between saying, “Patient doesn’t drink liquor” and “The patient denies liquor utilize.”

In reference to the examination of the head, eyes, ears, nose and throat, who is showing restorative understudies to compose things like this?

“HEENT: normocephalic, atraumatic.”

Except for Joseph Merrick, known as “The Elephant Man,” pretty much every individual I have ever observed is normocephalic. What’s more, other than the individuals who have endured a harm, the heads of most patients demonstrate no injury.

It is essential for a doctor to know how to compose a sound sentence and spell words accurately. Poor spelling and punctuation reflect either obliviousness or messiness. Take “guaiac” for instance. It alludes to a reagent utilized less every now and again now for the testing of the stool for blood. It is not spelled “guiac” or “guaic.” If you can’t spell it, utilize “heme” or basically say, “The stool test for blood was negative.”

Most exceedingly awful of all is misquoting the plural of “diverticulum.” I have seen colorectal specialists and gastroenterologists, both of whom ought to know better, allude to more than one diverticulum as “diverticuli” or “diverticulae.” Listen up, individuals. Diverticulum is gotten from a Latin word. Its sex is fix. Perhaps you can recollect that it by considering other comparable words: one bacterium, numerous microorganisms; datum, information; stratum, strata.